TriRegol

Order TriRegol for a contraceptive that matches your period cycle

TriRegol is a combined pill (containing synthetic versions of oestrogen and progesterone hormones). TriRegol is phasic, which means the hormone dosing follows your natural menstrual cycle for better control.

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Strength Quantity Price Stock
30mcg/125mcg63 tablets£10.35In Stock
Prices exclude a prescription fee. This treatment requires a quick online consultation,
which a doctor will review to determine if a prescription is appropriate.

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Information

Dr Samantha Miller

Reviewed by Dr Samantha Miller MB ChB
(2017, University of Glasgow)
GMC number: 7561464

Information last reviewed 20/02/2021

About

What is TriRegol?

TriRegol is a type of combined contraceptive pill containing both oestrogen and progestogen hormones which help to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

How does TriRegol work?

The pill contains ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel, synthetic versions of the oestrogen and progesterone that exist naturally in your body. TriRegol primarily works by reducing the chance of the ovaries releasing an egg (ovulation). The hormones in the pill also thicken the mucus surrounding the entrance to the cervix, preventing sperm from entering, and they thin the lining of the womb (endometrium), making it difficult for a fertilised egg to implant into the womb.

How effective is TriRegol?

TriRegol is over 99% effective if it is taken correctly all of the time. If the pill is not taken correctly all of the time, it is around 91% effective. This means that with typical use, 9 women out of every 100 taking TriRegol may fall pregnant. With perfect use, only 1 out of every 100 women using TriRegol will fall pregnant.

When does TriRegol start to work?

TriRegol will start to work right away if you take it on the first day of a natural period. You can also start it at another time in your cycle if you are sure you are not pregnant, but you will need to use condoms for the first 7 days of pill-taking to prevent pregnancy.

TriRegol for non-contraceptive purposes

TriRegol can also be used to regulate your period and can help to ease premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Your periods might also be lighter, and less painful. Some women find that phasic pills such as TriRegol cause fewer hormonal side effects such as headaches and mood changes than monophasic combined pills.

Can you use TriRegol for period delay?

TriRegol can be used to delay your period while you’re taking it. You can do this by skipping the pill-free week between packs and starting the next one right away.

Switching contraceptive pill

There are numerous types of contraceptive pills available and you may need to try a few different brands before finding one that works for you. If you are taking a different form of the combined pill and are changing to TriRegol then you should finish your current pill strip and begin taking TriRegol the next day without taking a break. Speak with your doctor for more information on how to switch pills safely. 

You can switch from the progestogen-only pill at any time but TriRegol won't start to work right away. You will need to use an additional barrier method of contraception for the first 7 days.

If I have vomited, will TriRegol still work?

If you have been sick or had diarrhoea within 4 hours of taking TriRegol then your contraception may not work. This is because the pill may not have been fully absorbed by your body. If you are unwell, you should continue to take your TriRegol as normal, but you should use extra precautions (condoms) for the duration of illness, and until you have been symptom-free for 7 days. 

When can I get pregnant after taking TriRegol?

When you stop taking the pill, you can then get pregnant at any time. It's recommended to wait until your natural period returns; which may be 1–2 months. Talk to your GP or family planning clinic if you are trying to get pregnant. They will be able to advise you on how to come off the pill safely and any steps you can take to ensure you have a healthy conception. 

Ingredients

Active ingredients

The active ingredients contained in TriRegol are ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel. There are different amounts of these synthetic hormones depending on where you are in the pack:

  • The 6 pink tablets contain 50 micrograms of levonorgestrel and 30 micrograms of ethinylestradiol
  • The 5 white tablets contain 40 micrograms of levonorgestrel and 75 micrograms of ethinylestradiol
  • The 10 ochre/yellow tablets contain 30 micrograms of levonorgestrel and 150 micrograms of ethinylestradiol

Inactive ingredients

The other ingredients are colloidal anhydrous silica, magnesium stearate, talc, maize starch, lactose monohydrate, carmellose sodium, povidone K30, macrogol, copovidone, calcium carbonate, sucrose, red iron oxide (E172), titanium dioxide (E171) and yellow iron oxide (E172).

Which ingredients can cause an allergic reaction?

Birth control pills such as TriRegol have not been known to cause a severe allergic reaction in users. However, signs and symptoms of a severe reaction include hard to breathe, hives, facial swelling, skin rash, and dizziness. Make sure to look out for these symptoms and if you experience one or more of them you should seek immediate medical attention. The pill does contain lactose monohydrate but is deemed to be safe to consume in those with a lactose intolerance.

Dosage

What should I do if I miss a pill?

If it has been 12 hours or more since you were due to take it then follow the instructions for a missed pill that is contained in the pack. Where you are in your pack will dictate what action you should take:

  • If you miss a pill in the first week: You may not be protected from pregnancy. Take the missed tablet as soon as you remember, even if that means taking two at once. You should use barrier contraception for the next 7 days of pill-taking. If you have had sex in 7 days prior to the missed pill, pregnancy is possible. 
  • If you miss a pill in the second week: As long as you have taken your pills correctly for the 7 days prior to the missed pill, your contraception is unlikely to be affected. Take the missed pill as soon as you remember and continue your pill-taking as normal. 
  • If you miss a pill in the third week: Your contraception is unlikely to be affected if you’ve taken your pills correctly up until the missed pill. Take the missed pill as soon as you remember and instead of taking a break at the end of the pack, start the next pack. 

If there have been any worries about not taking the pill correctly or missing pills, speak to your healthcare provider.
 

What should I do if I took a pill too late?

If you have taken your pill up to 12 hours later than usual, your contraception will not be affected. Ensure you take the rest of your pills on time. If it has been more than 12 hours since your scheduled pill time, follow the instructions below for ‘what should I do if I miss a pill?’

Is it safe to take TriRegol for a long time?

TriRegol is usually safe to take for as long as you need it. Taking the combined pill increases the risk of blood clots for all women. If you have a medical condition which increases your risk of blood clots (such as having had a blood clot before or suffering from migraines with aura), or if you are older, obese or a smoker, you may not be suitable for combined hormonal contraception. Your doctor will assess your medical history before prescribing you the pill.

If anything changes in your medical history or if you develop any new conditions, you should speak with your doctor or pharmacist to check this pill is still suitable for you

When will my period start again after I stop taking TriRegol?

Your natural period usually returns within 2–4 weeks of stopping taking TriRegol. It may take a few months for your cycle to return to its natural rhythm.

How to start TriRegol?

You should ideally start taking TriRegol on the first day of your period as you will then be protected from pregnancy right away. If this isn't possible, it’s recommended that you start it on days 2–5 of your period, however, in this case, you will need to use condoms, or another additional contraceptive, for the first seven days.

How to take TriRegol?

TriRegol can be taken at any time of the day but it should be taken at the same time each day. Try to choose a time which is convenient for you and that will be easy to remember. Setting an alarm or reminder on your phone may help you to get into the routine of it. Each strip of pills contains 21 tablets. When you reach the end of one strip, wait 7 days before starting the next strip. This is when you will likely have a withdrawal bleed, similar to a period.

How to use TriRegol for period delay?

To use TriRegol for period delay, skip the 7 day break in between pill packs. This will delay your period until the following month. It's recommended to ask your doctor for advice about delaying your period with TriRegol.

Side Effects

Common side effects include: 

  • Headaches 
  • Nausea
  • Breast pain or tenderness 
  • Mood changes 
  • Depression 
  • Weight gain 
  • Yellow-brown patchy discolouration of the skin (cholasma)
  • Acne 
  • Gallstones (cholelithiasis)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting

Uncommon side effects may include: 

  • Fluid retention 
  • Nervousness 
  • Loss of libido (sex drive)
  • Vomiting
  • Breast cancer
  • Migraines
  • High blood pressure 
  • Diarrhoea 
  • Itchy rash (urticaria)
  • Breast enlargement 

Rare side effects may include: 

  • Hyperlipidaemia 
  • Poor tolerance of contact lenses 
  • Hearing impairment (otosclerosis)
  • Blood clots
  • Hypersensitivity 
  • Red nodules or lumps on the skin 
  • Irritable bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Skin disorders 
  • Breast discharge 
  • Vaginal discharge 
  • Weight loss 
  • Liver tumour
  • Sydenham's Chorea 
  • Visual disturbance 
  • Heart attack 
  • System lupus erythematosus 
  • Pancreas inflammation

Contraindications

Do not take TriRegol if: 

  • You are allergic to any of the ingredients 
  • You have ever experienced a blood clot 
  • You have a disorder that affects your blood circulation, including genetic conditions
  • You have ever had a heart attack or angina 
  • You have ever had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) 
  • You have diabetes with blood vessel damage 
  • You have a disorder of the blood vessels in the eye 
  • You have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure 
  • You have heart problems 
  • You have ever had liver disease or a liver tumour
  • You have atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat) 
  • You have breast, ovarian or cervical cancer 
  • You have unexplained vaginal bleeding 
  • You get migraines with aura (visual or sensory symptoms)
  • You might be pregnant 
  • You are over the age of 35 and you smoke
  • You are over the age of 50
  • You have recently undergone, or are due to have major surgery

 
Talk to your doctor before taking TriRegol if any of the following apply to you: 

  • You have recently had a baby or are breastfeeding
  • High blood pressure 
  • You have a family history of blood clots or a related condition 
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin)
  • Pruritus 
  • Gallstones 
  • Porphyria 
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus 
  • Haemolytic uraemic syndrome 
  • Sydenham's Chorea 
  • Herpes gestationis 
  • Otosclerosis 
  • Disturbed liver function 
  • Diabetes 
  • Depression 
  • Ulcerative colitis 
  • Chloasma
  • Vascular disease

Drug Interactions

Tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines as they may interfere with the way TriRegol works: 

  • Antibiotics, particularly Ampicillin, Tetracyclines, Rifampicin and Rifabutin
  • Immunosuppressant drugs such as Cyclosporine
  • Barbiturates 
  • Anti-fungal medication such as Griseofulvin 
  • HIV drugs such as Ritonavir 
  • Tricyclic antidepressants 
  • St John's wort 
  • Epilepsy medications including Hydantoins, Carbamazepine, Phenobarbital, Phenytoin, Topiramate
  • Other hormonal therapies
  • Antihypertensive drugs
  • Diabetes drugs

Always tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking, or planning to take, to ensure the combination is safe. This includes over-the-counter medications and recreational drugs. 

Treatment Options

TriRegol vs the mini pill

TriRegol differs from the mini-pill as it contains two types of hormones; oestrogen and progestogen. The mini-pill only has a progestogen as the active ingredient and is often referred to as the progestogen-only pill. The mini-pill may produce fewer side effects and doesn't pose as many health risks as the combined pill. This means it may be suitable for women with high blood pressure or those who experience unpleasant side effects with the combined pill. 

Alternatives to TriRegol

Other types of the combined pill which contain the same hormonal ingredients are: 

Dr Felix stocks all available types of the contraceptive pill in the UK, including combined pills and mini-pills. Long term reversible contraceptives are available from your GP or family planning clinic. These include the copper IUD, hormonal IUS, implant and injection. 

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